In a June 20, 2012 article in the London Evening Standard, Jonathan Prynn wrote about the Elephant and Castle regeneration, and the exciting progress that will take place to restore this central London site back to the vibrancy of its heyday, making it one of the great destinations in Central London. The £1.5 ($3USD) Billion, 15-year masterplan for the Elephant and Castle area aims to create 2,800 homes, 5,000 jobs and central London's biggest new park in 70 years.

The Elephant and Castle project is one of the original developments in the C40 Climate Positive Development Program, which was created to meet the pressing dual challenges of rapid urbanization and climate change. Launched in partnership with the Clinton Climate Initiative and the US Green Building Council, the program aims to create a model for large-scale urban communities that reduce greenhouse gases and serve as urban laboratories for cities seeking to grow in ways that are environmentally sustainable and economically viable. In joining the Climate Positive Development program, project developers commit to the extremely ambitious goal of surpassing net-zero emissions by striving to reduce on-site emissions as far as possible, and offsetting the remaining emissions through direct actions that abate greenhouse gases in the surrounding community. Together, the 18 Climate Positive Development projects now underway around the world will directly reduce the carbon footprint of nearly one million people. Indirectly, they will benefit many times that number, by informing specific district-scale planning, policy, and program efforts.

In the Evening Standard article, Prynn shared an update about the project developer Lend Lease finalizing their application to the London Borough of Southwark; this will be submitted within the next few weeks. Indeed, Lend Lease is working closely with London Borough of Southwark, Greater London Authority (GLA) and Transport for London (TFL) to create the exemplary new development. Peter John, leader of Southwark Council said in the article that the project will bring social and economic benefits and “pull” the centre of the city further south into Southwark.

To read the full Evening Standard article, click here.